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Summer Session 2019

image of UCSC Art Department Summer Session 2019

Summer Session 1 (June 24 - July 26, 2019)

ART 20L (online): Introduction to Drawing and Painting wtih Grant Whipple: Online only course. Introduces the material practices of painting in combination with the formal vocabulary of the visual arts. A discussion of values, form, color, and figure/ground relationships enters into each class. Students are billed for a materials fee. (General Education Code(s): PR-C.) 

ART 26: Introduction to Printmaking with Bridget Henry: Survey of print medium: basic terminology, techniques, application of tools, materials, and condensed history of development of printmaking. Assignments consist of individual and collaborative projects aimed at building skills and gathering technical experience. Introduction to relief printing (black and white and color), intaglio, letterpress, and interface between photography/computer and the handmade print. Exploration of print media for communication of issues including formal aesthetics, social/psychological and personal narrative. Students are billed a materials fee. (General Education Code(s): PR-C, A)

ART 80T (online): Digital Tools for Contemporary Art Practice with Kristen Gillette: Online only course. Introduces the digital tools and mediums available to contemporary art practices. Tools are explored from a historical and theoretical context and from a technical perspective through hands-on tutorials. A variety of artworks that use digital mediums are also examined. Covers photo and vector editors, sound and video editing, basic 3D modeling, and images and interactions generated by code. Students should have basic computer literacy. (General Education Code(s): PE-T.) 

ART 105-01: Introduction to 3D Printing, Laser Cutting, & More: Learn to design functional objects, sculpture, and other digitally inspired forms in a variety of 3-D applications (Cinema 4-D, Maya, AutoCad, Rhino, SketchUp), then produce those models as physical objects with a variety of rapid prototyping methods including additive 3-D printing, CNC milling, vacuum forming, and laser cutting. Students are billed a course materials fee. (Formerly 3-D Alchemy: 3-D Design/Rapid Prototyping/3-D Printing/CNC Milling/Laser Cutting.) (Also offered as Digital Arts and New Media 140. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) (General Education Code(s): PR-C.)

ART 113: Illustrating Stories: Fantasy & Documentary Narratives with Frank Galuszka: Illustration is communicating stories through visual art. These stories can be full narratives or slices of life. They can be documentary or fantasy. Illustration is more aligned with popular culture than the traditional visual fine arts.  Illustration either accompanies a written narrative, or suggests a narrative that could be put, in part at least, into words. It is meant to communicate with a defined or wide audience. This class will be taught using New Yorker covers as examples of illustration at a level of excellence that is accessible, thought-provoking, and enduring.  These covers will be examined and discussed for content (how content is expressed) and for formal qualities (composition, color, style).  Wit and humor, as well as restraint and sophistication, will also be discussed as illustrated by these examples of cover art.  Inclusivity and exclusivity will be discussed, as will explicit and implicit social issues. Other illustrations will be shown and discussed, including bad illustrations that show common errors in illustration. Work for this class will be done in drawing and in painting media.  Some work may also be done in digital media and in mixed media. Painting media will be water-based media.  Work will be done on traditional illustration surfaces such as watercolor paper, illustration board, bristol board and hardboard panels. 

ART 150: Darkroom Practices with Jack Chapman: Students concentrate on darkroom practices and explore visual ideas, directing their work toward individualized goals. Required work includes making photographic prints, reading historical and theoretical works, and examination of photographs. Students are billed a materials fee. May be repeated for credit. 

ART 183: Metal Fabrication with Sean Monaghan: Focus on teaching intermediate to advanced students the processes and techniques of direct metal fabrication for contemporary sculpture and design. Explores a range of welding, cutting, and forming techniques and processes through demonstrations, slide lectures, field trips, and studio time. Demonstrations, slide lectures, and critical discussion of work help develop technical and conceptual skills. Students are billed a materials fee. May be repeated for credit.

Summer Session 2 (July 29 - August 30, 2019)

ART 20J: Introduction to Drawing and Painting with Susana Terrell: Introduces the material practices of painting in combination with the formal vocabulary of the visual arts. A discussion of values, form, color, and figure/ground relationships enters into each class. Students are billed for a materials fee. (General Education Code(s): PR-C.) 

ART 105-02: Introduction to 3D Printing, Laser Cutting, & More: Learn to design functional objects, sculpture, and other digitally inspired forms in a variety of 3-D applications (Cinema 4-D, Maya, AutoCad, Rhino, SketchUp), then produce those models as physical objects with a variety of rapid prototyping methods including additive 3-D printing, CNC milling, vacuum forming, and laser cutting. Students are billed a course materials fee. (Formerly 3-D Alchemy: 3-D Design/Rapid Prototyping/3-D Printing/CNC Milling/Laser Cutting.) (Also offered as Digital Arts and New Media 140. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)(General Education Code(s): PR-C.)

ART 106O (online): Introduction to Animation with Kristen Gillette: Online only class. Introduces animation techniques, practices, history, and theories. Students learn techniques and process in 2D, stop-motion, and digital animation. Projects teach students the workflow of animating including script development, storyboarding, frame-by-frame animation, animatic, digital, and post-production. Students are required to research artists, both historical and contemporary, working in the field of animation and to be able to discuss the work. The course teaches theoretical and historical perspectives on animation and requires students to develop a critical analysis and vocabulary. May be repeated for credit.

ART 132: Figure Painting with Noah Buchanan: Students learn the classical practice of painting the nude figure from life using traditional oil painting techniques. Students study short poses, limited color, and graduate to long pose, full color. Students are billed a materials fee. (Formerly course 102A.) May be repeated for credit. (General Education Code(s): PR-C.) 

ART 152C: View Camera Photography with Karolina Karlic: This class is a exploration of the processes, materials, and techniques of large-format photography. Students will learn the concepts and theories related to the view camera, its operational principles, including camera movements such as rise, fall, tilt, shift, and swing. This course emphasizes advanced understanding of negative exposure, sheet-film processing, tonal-range manipulation, digital scanning, and large-format output. Contemporary issues and concepts are explored through reading, visual research, discussion and then applied out in the field and in the production of large format photographs. Students are evaluated on the technical and visual context developed in individual projects. Students are billed a materials fee Note: Darkroom experience and introduction to photography is encouraged but not required. 

ART 155:  Photo Research Field Quarter, Claifornia Road Trip (10 Credits) with Jack Chapman: Art 155 is a 10 credit lecture course that offers students the unique opportunity to live and learn outside of the classroom actively engaging locations and communities across the entire state of California. We will be covering 2400 miles from Northern Mendocino County to the Salton Sea, from the Eastern Sierra and Death Valley to Big Sur. The PFRQ exposes students to several cultural, historical, and environmental issues facing the State of California. This exposure is intended to plant seeds of interest to further develop projects as students continue their study and art making practice at UC Santa Cruz.
The following locations will be visited during the class:
San Francisco
Redwood Valley, Frey Winery, Redwood Valley Rancheria/Reservation
Covelo, Round Valley Reservation
McLaughlin UC Reserve, Homestake Mine
Donner Lake
Lake Tahoe
Valentine Camp/SNARL UC Reserve
Manzanar Internment Camp
Owen’s Valley/Lake, Los Angeles Aqueduct
Death Valley
Mojave Desert, Granite Mountain UC Reserve
Boyd Deep Canyon UC Reserve
Salton Sea
Stunt Ranch UC Reserve
Big Sur, Big Creek UC Reserve

The PFRQ teaches camera handling skills, concepts of composition, exposure and lighting by engaging students on location in various challenging environments, as well as techniques for interaction with found subjects and participants. There will be significant focus on working as a positive and capable team member of an expeditionary group.  Wilderness first aid will be a component of the curriculum.

A digital image capture device of some kind is required. Digital SLRs, point and shoot cameras, phones and digital notebooks and tablets capable of image capture are all acceptable devices for use in this course. Shooting analog film in addition to digital image capture is encouraged. Data storage devices (laptop, external hard drive, and CF, SDHC, SDHC Micro cards) to backup collected information are strongly recommended. 

Course work will consist of visual/audio data collection with an independent research focus to be edited for use in future university classes and projects.  A daily field journal is required.  Students will be evaluated on the quality and content of collected data, participation in the field, the field journal and a final presentation of curated imagery.  Students are also required to engage in reading, written assignments, and group discussion.

The PFRQ requires serious commitment. There will be hiking in rugged environments, interactions with diverse and remote communities, and long-distance travel. No previous camping experience is required, but participants should expect to live, photograph, and actively participate on the road and outdoors with a small group throughout the quarter. The itinerary is subject to change due to environmental conditions like wildland fires, excessively dangerous heat (Death Valley at 127 degrees 7/25/2018), and air quality (smoke from fires, high winds at the Salton Sea).

The goal of this class is to develop skills that will enable individuals to pursue field research and visual data acquisition on their own and in groups.  This includes specific camera handling skills, data storage, visual literacy, components of composition, exposure and lighting, basic first aid, critical thinking, interpersonal skills to facilitate group travel and interactions with potential subjects and participants in personal research projects, creating and finding shelter on the road, and learning about photographic artists and their artworks.  

ART 164A: Screenprinting with Sarah Sanford: Introduces water-based screen printing. Students are introduced to processes including basic equipment, printing techniques, printing papers, stenciling processes, and photographic and digital techniques. Emphasis is on continued development of content and aesthetic awareness through the possibilities of screen printing. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.

Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs

https://studyabroad.ucsc.edu/programs/ucscfaculty-led/index.html

ART 189: Art in the Global Context – Czech Republic with Dee Hibbert-Jones: Join Professor Dee Hibbert-Jones next summer in this immersive studio art class where students create site-responsive sculptures, drawings, performances and installations that explore art in a global context. 
Arrival Date: August 11, 2019. End Date: August 31, 2019 
Much more information at:
https://ucsc-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs&mode=form&id=d...

ART 161B: Moku Hanga Printmaking in Tokyo with Jimin Lee: Join Professor Jimin Lee next summer to learn Japanese woodblock printmaking "Moku Hanga" known as the "Ukiyo-e technique" widely studied by artists today. Students will be able to study the treasured historical skills and tools of Moku Hanga with greater understanding and appreciation. 
Start Date: Monday, July 29, 2019. End Date: Saturday, August 31, 2019
2 Weeks at UCSC: July 29 - August 9 
3 Weeks at Tama Art University: August 12 - August 31
Much more information at:
https://ucsc-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs&mode=form&id=b...

 

Important Points About Summer Session Classes in the Art Department

  • Each course is 5 credits (unless otherwise noted)
  • Enrolled painting and drawing students get 24-hour access to the painting and drawing studios. Other studios have extended accessibility as determined by the instructors.
  • Taking Art classes in summer session affords you the rare luxury of not having to be an Art major to attend.
  • An added advantage of taking Art classes in Summer Session is that prerequisites are waived.
  • Art classes fill up quickly so make sure to be on the computer and ready to enroll as soon as enrollment opens.
  • Art classes in summer session will require 30 hours of work per week – 12 hours in class & 18 hours outside of class.

Do not attempt to take more than one art class in the same session.

Do not attempt to take an art class and another class within the same session.

Do not attempt to take an art class in summer session if you have a full time job.

(Attempting the above could result in a lower grade because of an inability to put in the full time required)

Please contact the Summer Session office or visit their website for more information on Summer Session. http://summer.ucsc.edu/index.html